Ham/Amateur Radio

#1

All things amateur radio.
Get licensed. Report back.

Getting Licensed - ARRL
](http://www.arrl.org/getting-licensed)

The Technician class license is the entry-level license of choice for most new ham radio operators. To earn the Technician license requires passing one examination totaling 35 questions on radio theory, regulations and operating practices.

http://www.arrl.org

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#3

My father in law got me to look at it closer last week and now I really am starting to see its importance in communicating (yes, I’m a slow learner), especially if SHTF.

Figured this thread could encourage folks to get their licenses (really is simple), share resources, hold people accountable if they say they’ll go for it, etc.

Testing in the Nashville area looks like Sept 14th. I’ll be there!

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#4

Biggest caution on Ham Systems pitfall for shtf scenario are the repeater driven networks. Due to disabled repeaters during such events. Established communications within that system will become nonexistent. Alternative being networks of individual independent Operators functional outside the repeater system. Which are modern digital relay methods that simplify human to human old school relay system.

Just saying for those unfamiliar with Ham Operation and wanting the benefits of gaining that edge against catastrophes.

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#5

FinL said:
Talking about HF, not UHF repeaters.

“Also most radios can receive wide range of frequencies. Well beyond the amateur bands. This enables you at minimum listen to what’s going on across the spectrum.”

@AtypicalRift thoughts?

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#6

I’m copy pasting it back and forth. :slight_smile:

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#7

Popular 2meter band system being pushed are directly connected with repeater systems. They have capacity to function outside that system however the range is limited. Not an Ham personal, having limited knowledge on such. I believe that 10 meters band are currently advertised along with 2 meters radios as good starting systems, I agree with beginners benefits and reasonable price.
Great on family outings or cross-country travel. Which having reception in areas not having cellphone signal, etcetera. That capacity is largely due to repeater systems.
Need to established off repeater systems networks is main point for beginners.

Error above on 10 meters, perhaps the 6 meter system is one. Definitely the 2 meters bands are sold with convenience and safety in mind.
10 meters is same as Citizens Band CB radio not repeater network dependent.
My bad

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#8

Gotcha Rift, I’m going to see if I can get my father-in-law on here to discuss this kind of stuff (I would laugh if I could!). Thanks for the explanations.

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#9

Glad to see this topic, little bit of my understanding deserves consideration for beginners. Who rely on repeaters thinking about family safety. Then struggling to get connection after an event. Due to underlying unknowns salespeople didn’t highlight. Lol lolol

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#10

Hell, it’s all new to me, but it’s a start!

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#11

Isn’t Ham radio too censored or regulated or limited or something?

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#12

Not sure. Just figured understanding other communication avenues is important. If you got a radio, a power source, and a antenna, you can communicate. Seems pretty simple

Babysteps

Edit: although, to get your license to communicate takes jumping through some hoops, learning about the mechanics of it all seems pretty smart.

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#13

In my family, I’am the one who was most likely to get Ham Operation licence.
Because I was always messing with CB radios. However my desire for such never materialized into license. Another family member actually got licensed and uses 2 meters and repeater systems.
Lol lolol
Other items were greater concerns for my personal life. Regardless of benefits I recognize about shortwave and Ham radio stations.

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#14

@joeyarnoldvn
Your reference is towards a topic censorship?
Mostly licensing and appropriate protocols.
Public broadcasting is more of the censorship transmission your suggestions are related with.

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#15

Current tests for beginners levels have been tailored towards average citizenry. Compared with some years ago.
[
American Radio Relay League › gett…

Web results

Getting Licensed - ARRL
](http://www.arrl.org/getting-licensed)

The Technician class license is the entry-level license of choice for most new ham radio operators. To earn the Technician license requires passing one examination totaling 35 questions on radio theory, regulations and operating practices.

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#16

That’s the one I’m studying right now. Coming from knowing nothing about this stuff it should be interesting to see how it goes. (I’ll add that link to the top as well)

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#17

Actually when I got into CB radio the licensing was required, enforcement was the problem. Which actually I have CB licensing. Not considered as a Ham Operation. Not sure were those papers are. Lol lolol
The users were supposed to keep the language clean and minimal protocols.

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#18

@greatgonzochops
Your taking sample test online?

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#19

Uh oh, what I do? (20)

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#20

Ha! I’ll take a sample test when I’ve studied some more. When I say “new” I mean “we are driving back to Tennessee and just started looking into all this” new.

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#21

@greatgonzochops
Online sample testing isn’t limited to once only affairs.
The way they were 10 years or more with one I was going at.

Great practice sessions.
Never got to finally taking the official test. Lol lolol ironically my family members who least likely interested in electronic gadgets got Ham Licensing.
I am grappling with self on this lol lolol

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