Infowars Army Recipe Thread

#22

Awww! Thank you! :sparkling_heart::blush: He knows he’s lucky, he tells me all the time. He actually loves helping me out in the kitchen cutting up all the veggies and stuff. We make a good team.

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#23

NANA’S EASY PIE DOUGH

Gather your ingredients and come back for more. I will be posting this today in sections.

3 INGREDIENTS

  • FLOUR - I use fresh ground, non-gmo, organic, no poisons. Substitute all you want but be prepared for side-effects if you do. I am so disappointed with the quality of gluten free
  • VERY COLD WATER - 1 cup of “Pro-Pure” filtered water in your freezer to chill
  • CLEAN COLD BUTTER (sweet cream OK, salted OK, unsalted OK)- if you don’t know what that means, check out the information on butter from Weston Price.org (please don’t go all conspiracy theory on me that this is a eugenics site - they have some great resources on how to eat like our grandparents did).

ASSEMBLY

  • I throw a couple cups of flour in my favorite bowl
  • I use a hand held chopper blade to cut my cold butter into smaller and smaller bits, blending into dough. Make it rather crumby but don’t over blend. I cut about 1 stick of very cold butter into 2 cups of flour. Sometimes I add more butter or flour depending on what I want. More butter = richer crust, less butter = dryer crust. I like the crust to bubble up butter so I am generous on the butter. Homemade butter makes this pie-crust impossible to resist. I apologize that I do everything by look and feel, it is a much faster way to cook and so those of you who are demand precision, forgive me.
  • I let this sit for a little bit because inevitably I am drawn to another task. You can also put this mix in the fridge/freezer and finish another day if you get too busy.
  • When my water in the freezer is very cold I slowly add 1 tblsp at a time to blend into the flour. Basically you are looking for a not too sticky but not too dry dough. You put the water in the middle of the flour and add flour from the sides until you can handle the dough by hand.
    USE YOUR HANDS - not utensils - it makes it ten times easier.
  • I have a good feel now for exactly how much water I need to add but for beginners start with 1-2 tablespoons (usually up to 5 or 6 tblsp but sometimes more) until you can get the dough into a ball. The goal is to get the dough into a ball that will not stick to sides. Be careful adding more water and flour, this can go downhill fast if you get impatient.

+Some people add salt but if you have salted butter - just don’t
+Some people put the dough in the fridge before rolling but it ain’t necessary
+Some freeze the dough (this batch will make 2 servings of dough - top/bottom of pie) and defrost it later when they have the filling ready
+I like to use one and freeze the other, it is easy to defrost in the morning and have dough for a pie after dinner. Also, I do put into fridge for an hour, it is easier to roll out. If you would like to know my favorite dough rolling utensils, bowls, tools, let me know. I love to share those details too.

I will add another post on NANA’S EASY FRUIT PIE - no goopy stuff in this one. Also, will add a pic but there is one problem - the pie I made yesterday is nearly gone. I must make another - cherry today. Nothing better than a real cherry pie with real homemade vanilla ice-cream on a summer day! Ice-cream not required…

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#24

It’s very true that Men appreciate and love a woman willing to prepare a delicious meal. But that my dear works both ways!! I actually do the bulk of the cooking in my household and not only does my woman enjoy my efforts but the rest of the family does as well.
When I was a youngster my grandmother, mother and aunts all taught us how to cook (In the Kitchen) Where my Grandfether, Father and all my Uncles and Dads Buddies taught how to cook not only on an open fire, but charcoal/hardwoods as well as a Gas Grill. I’m not a big fan of gas grills but they do definitely have there place. I know several friends of mine that cook almost exclusively with gas and they are fine cooks!!
During an Ice Storm in Mo. some 15 or 16 years ago we were out of power for 16 days and the temps were horribly cold!! My house was total electric and we were on well water as we lived out in the sticks. The roads were blocked in both directions with downed trees and power poles. My neighbor and I used our gas grills not only as cook stoves but also as way to melt down snow and ice for water in order to keep the dishes washed and flush the commodes. Those gas grills came in very handy during that time!!!

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#25

I wish you were my neighbor!
You would love reading Nancy Pearcey, she highlights the lost art of men in the kitchen and the historical significance of this decline in culture today. I will see if I can find an excerpt on this FACT today.

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#26

My neighbor ( Doug ) and I made sure to keep the wood burning stoves going strong 24/7 and the women and children were both warm and well fed as well as protected from any potential looters.
I think our wives gained a whole new level of appreciation for us during that tough time! We both always laid in a good supply of firewood for the winter so that was already taken care of. We both had more than enough food to hold out between canned goods, fresh meats fish and plenty of wild game in freezer. We kept the meat from thawing by simply placing it in large duffle bags and hanging it up in the trees to keep the animals from getting to it. The extreme cold did the rest!! The only area that Doug was lacking in was fresh drinking water. Like I said we were on well water so no electricity no pump!!
I had an emergency supply of fresh drinking water stock piled (Some 400 Gallons) so I had that covered!!
A lot of things I do my wife used to kinda scoff at and poke fun at me about. However all that quickly dissipated when it got rough because we had more than enough to get through that tough time!!
When the repair crews finally got to our area to put up new poles and run new line, We kept those crews fed with fresh hot meals and plenty of hot coffee 24/7. They were so appreciative because they were working in such blistering cold temps.
Nothing says Thank You like a big hot bowl of venison chili, fresh hot cornbread and plenty of hot coffee around a big fire!!!

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#27

Agreed!! I good supply, selection of cast iron cookware is in my opinion a good prep item to have on hand!! It’s so versatile and can be used on virtually any source of heat. I have found a lot of mine at yard sales believe it or not. And you can but it for pennies on the dollar!!
I have my moms set but am always looking for more!!!

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#28

Dang!!! This looks delicious!!! I gotta try this out!!!

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#29

You are all together just a wonderful human being @OleParatrooper :sparkling_heart::sparkling_heart:

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#30

Thank you for the kind words Betty_Rose. I’m definitely going to try your meatloaf recipe!!!

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#31

And they last forever!

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#32

Easy upkeep as well. Rub some oil on them and bake it in.

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#33

That’s very true. I had an Old Country Doctor tell me years ago that another benefit from cooking with cast iron was that a small amount of the iron leaches off in your food as you are cooking and it actually good for you as you need iron in your diet everyday.
He showed me a paper that he had written for the AMA many years prior. He had done his own study as to the benefits of cooking in cast iron. The iron levels especially in young developing children of the early 20th century were a bit higher and better balanced than the young people of today. He said the kids were healthier back then than today and sited this as one of the main contributors to that.
It made perfect sense to me because as a youngster I was very rarely sick at all. My mother and grandmother cooked exclusively in cast iron. There were many years when I was going to school that I had perfect attendance record for the entire year because I never missed school because of being sick.
It makes one think anyway. Those Old Country Doctors knew more than just what they learned in medical school!!!

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#34
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#35

Iron deficiencies and iodine deficiency can be tested


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#36

Interesting and informative video. Thanks Rob_Roy

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#37

I sped through it - fast forwarded to save time but thankful to be reminded of the easiest ways to restore cast. I knew about “Coca Cola” and some swear it makes the meanest roast and eats through the gunk in pipes better than draino.

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#38

Oh absolutely. You can also use it to clean corroded battery cables. Works great!!!

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#39

I nominate @OleParatrooper to start a Homestead thread.
Perhaps a Renaissance Man discussion of sorts.

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#40

Hahahahahaha!! Well thank you. I will look into doing that!! So many topics in that area deserve and really need to be covered!!! Thank you for the vote of confidence!!!
God Bless!

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#41

I have to be honest therecfem this is a very intriguing undertaking. What is so striking to me in this day and age is that what most people think is a crisis, In the early 19th century when the mountain men, trail blazers, pioneers and settlers were moving west making due with No Electricity, No Running Water or Modern Medicines that are available as we know it today was quite simply everyday life. Basically it was No Big deal.
And here’s the problem, One massive solar flare like we saw happen in the early 19th century which melted every single telegraph line from one end of the country to the other or an EMP. We would be thrown back in history by 200 years virtually overnight!! The most startling thing about it is people don’t possess the Very Basic Skills needed to survive and keep their families well fed, protected, safe and sound.
The numbers I have seen are as high as 90% of the people would be dead or dying within the first year. To me that is very frightening!!

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