Infowars Bull Horn Handoff Challenge!

#1

ATTENTION!
CALLING ALL INFOWARRIOR AND THE #INFOWARSARMY MEMBERS.

IT’S TIME FOR ROLL CALL
FALL IN!

GET OFF YOUR ASSES AND WAKE THE MASSES! LEGAL AND LAWFULL PUBLIC ACTIVISM IS WHAT WE NEED IN THIS TIME OF UNPRECEDENTED #CENSORSHIP.

OUR VOICES WILL NEVER BE SILENCED!
STAND UP AND BE HEARD IN THE #3DWORLD

YOU TO CAN BE A RECIPIENT OF THE INFOWARS.COM LEGEND BULL HORN. SUBMIT VIDEOS AT HILLBILL1977@HOTMAIL.COM UNTIL JULY 31

Alex Jones has been using a Bull Horns for political activism since the creation of INFOWARS.COM AND PRISONPLANET.COM Alex has used bullhorns to bring awarness and spark activism in order to prevent the ELITES TYRANNICAL PLAN TO INSLAVE HUMANITY.

JOIN THE SHORT LIST OF INFO WARRIORS THAT HAVE BEEN PASSED THE TORCH OF ACTIVISM
20190606_203043





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Post an Infocomms (IWA) Group
#2

I hope hillbill1977@hotmail.com gets overloaded with entries. @DEPLORABLE_HILL will you be posting the videos here for all to see?

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#3

Well done bro.

I been wanting to do a event in New Braunfels Texas to catch all the Tubers on the river. @Texas_T @PastorSam and anyone in the San Antonio area hit me up if you want to setup something. I have the perfect place with close parking next to a perfect bridge with lots of Tubers.

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#4

Outstanding Work Hill…
#HOOAH
I am the Infantry–Lord of Battle! For two centuries I have kept our Nation safe, purchasing freedom with my blood. to tyrants, I am the day of reckoning; to the suppressed, the hope for the future. Where the fighting is thick, there am I…I am the Infantry! FOLLOW ME…

2 / 2SHOW CAPTION +

FORT BENNING, Ga. - The Infantry’s signature icon turned 50 on Monday, and the man behind the statue returned to Fort Benning for a “birthday” celebration.

MAJ® Eugene Wyles made the trip from his home in Louisiana to be the featured guest at a ceremony in the National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center at Patriot Park. In 1959, he posed for the original “Follow Me” statue while attending Officer Candidate School.

“Right now, I’m on a cloud, just floating around and everything is so serene and peaceful,” Wyles said. "A lot of it is excitement and the honor that they’ve given me. It’s hard to describe something like this.

“It’s the greatest feeling to know you’ve got all these people, a lot of them your comrades you served with, and their families … it really touches you.”

Originally called “The Infantryman,” the statue was dedicated May 3, 1960, on Eubanks Field by then-Secretary of the Army Wilber Brucker. Wyles was flown in on a helicopter from Ranger School in Dahlonega, Ga., to attend the unveiling ceremony.

Four years later, it was moved to the new Infantry Hall and renamed “Follow Me.”

A bronze replica was built in 2004 and stands on post in front of Building 35, the former Infantry headquarters that’s now Ridgway Hall. But the original statue became part of the National Infantry Museum collection and sits atop a granite pedestal in the rotunda outside.

“What a celebration, what a birthday,” said Wyles, now 77, adding he never dreamed “Follow Me” would become the huge Infantry symbol it is today. “I thought maybe around Fort Benning, it would be well-known, but never a worldwide thing … It blows my mind.”

MG® Jerry White, the National Infantry Foundation chairman, said he was a new second lieutenant in Airborne School when the statue was built.

“There just wasn’t a better person anywhere to pose for it than Gene Wyles - a young, dynamic, good-looking Soldier, noncommissioned officer in OCS,” he said. “But no one knew then what it was going to mean to us 50 years later, (that) it would be the rallying cry for the Infantry … It really is that glue that holds us together.”

Wyles joined the Army at 17. A recruiter “took my cotton hoe and gave me an M1 rifle, and said, ‘Go fight for your country,’” he told the audience.

After reaching the rank of sergeant first class, the Army’s top NCO grade at the time, Wyles said he decided to enter OCS at Fort Benning. There, he was chosen among four candidates to be the model for what would become “Follow Me.”

Posing was tedious work, he said. Wyles occasionally had to stand in one place for up to a half-hour as the sculptors, PFCs Manfred Bass and Karl Van Krog, measured his arms, legs, fingers, nose, ear lobes and other body parts to make them twice the size of the young Soldier. They cast the statue in resin and steel.

“I wouldn’t even try to guess how many Soldiers stood in front of that statue for pictures with their family, and since have sacrificed their lives for us,” White said.

White said he met Wyles about two years after its unveiling, when they were at Mountain Climbing School in Alaska. But the two lost touch and hadn’t seen each other until Monday’s ceremony.

Wyles was enlisted for 10 years and spent another decade as an officer, completing one tour in Korea and two in Vietnam.

“That’s not me. That’s not me,” Wyles said of the “Follow Me” statue. “That is the Infantry. And that’s those guys that don’t get any publicity that it represents. It’s not me … It’s the Infantry and the Infantry spirit.”

#HOOAH
#WTFA
IT HAS BEEN A HONOR…
BIG-RED-1…
KANSAS-OUT…

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#5

You are the #BULLHORNWARS

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#6

you are the #BULLHORNWARS

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#7

Yes I will! Bring them on!

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#8

Thank you. That would be appreciated. Can’t wait. Thanks again.

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